cosmosontv:

Take the Cosmos Quest!
Students and teachers - Make COSMOS part of your learning experience. Download the study guide to Episode 6.

cosmosontv:

Take the Cosmos Quest!

Students and teachers - Make COSMOS part of your learning experience. Download the study guide to Episode 6.

(via sagansense)

cosmosontv:

Take the Cosmos Quest!
Students and teachers - Make COSMOS part of your learning experience. Download the study guide to Episode 6.

cosmosontv:

Take the Cosmos Quest!

Students and teachers - Make COSMOS part of your learning experience. Download the study guide to Episode 6.

(via sagansense)

newyorker:

A cartoon by Barbara Smaller. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1hqj6q6

newyorker:

A cartoon by Barbara Smaller. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1hqj6q6

Well to be fair to the kid, keeping track of nomadic migratioons of tribes with no historical records can be tough

Well to be fair to the kid, keeping track of nomadic migratioons of tribes with no historical records can be tough

De acordo com William Glasser (1925-2013), um importante psiquiatra norte-americano, a memória humana retém informação da forma que o esquema mostra. VIA

De acordo com William Glasser (1925-2013), um importante psiquiatra norte-americano, a memória humana retém informação da forma que o esquema mostra. 
VIA

5 igrejas bizantinas

FIVE BYZANTINE CHURCHES

This film presents still and original moving footage of historically significant Byzantine churches in Greece. Set to the music of Byzantine hymns and chants, the film evokes the original context of many works of art in the exhibition Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections at the National Gallery of Art, October 6, 2013–March 2, 2014. Produced by the Department of Exhibition Programs at the National Gallery of Art. This film was made possible by the HRH Foundation.

 

via
vinylespassion:

Zenith Extended Range High Fidelity, 1954.

vinylespassion:

Zenith Extended Range High Fidelity, 1954.

(via citizendev)

Revista Cinéfilo, nº 29, Abril 1974.Via

Revista Cinéfilo, nº 29, Abril 1974.
Via

publius-esquire:

The book itself is nothing special, but I have to say this is probably my favorite cover of any history book I own. Like I want a poster of it.

publius-esquire:

The book itself is nothing special, but I have to say this is probably my favorite cover of any history book I own. Like I want a poster of it.

moma:

Want to learn more about Brazilian art history?
Tadeu Chiarelli, Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art at the University of São Paulo, gives a broad overview of the major artists who have contributed to the debate about modernism in Brazil. [Tarsila do Amaral. E.F.C.B. 1924. Oil on canvas. Image courtesy of Museum of Contemporary Art, University of São Paulo]

moma:

Want to learn more about Brazilian art history?

Tadeu Chiarelli, Director of the Museum of Contemporary Art at the University of São Paulo, gives a broad overview of the major artists who have contributed to the debate about modernism in Brazil. 

[Tarsila do Amaral. E.F.C.B. 1924. Oil on canvas. Image courtesy of Museum of Contemporary Art, University of São Paulo]

booksnbuildings:

This 14th century illuminated manuscript detail portrays an interesting concept of an ideal study.
Apart from the, in our eyes, unusual way of stacking books (by the way, here is an interesting article about why we store books the way we do, today), the study houses a number of interesting and peculiar items, including a ptolemian map (a precursor to an atlas or globe, I suppose), an astrolabe, a girdle book, a book stand, an early clock, some glass jars and what looks like a basket of herbs, as well as (of course, this being European Middle Ages) a devotional picture.
To this day, I think a library or a study is not complete without a few such odd gadgets and trinkets.

booksnbuildings:

This 14th century illuminated manuscript detail portrays an interesting concept of an ideal study.

Apart from the, in our eyes, unusual way of stacking books (by the way, here is an interesting article about why we store books the way we do, today), the study houses a number of interesting and peculiar items, including a ptolemian map (a precursor to an atlas or globe, I suppose), an astrolabe, a girdle book, a book stand, an early clock, some glass jars and what looks like a basket of herbs, as well as (of course, this being European Middle Ages) a devotional picture.

To this day, I think a library or a study is not complete without a few such odd gadgets and trinkets.